Sunday, July 26, 2009

The Immediacy of Music

Fabrizio, who is a City Daily Photo blogger in Torino, Italia, pointed us to this clip. Once again I was reminded of the one-shot-only nature of performance art vs the dither-ability of visual/material art. Thank goodness I'm engaged in the latter. (And yes, I talk to myself, or someone/something, on the loom.)

6 comments:

  1. What a lovely video, I only managed to watch half of it because it reminds me I could play my own piano.. just getting back into it after a few months break and it's sad having to relearn the familiar in order to get fingers and brain co-ordinated again. I hope I won't find that my weaving brain is getting rusty too.. not warped my floor loom at all in 2009 ;(

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  2. Once you get back on these horses, as it were, Dorothy, I hear they are like riding a bike, to mix it all up. All in due course!

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  3. That was wonderful, thanks Meg. What concentration he has. Now I'll be able to picture you softly talking to yourself at the loom.

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  4. Carol, no, no, not softly, not so much to yourself; it's more like nagging at my loom. :->

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  5. My wife discovered this site and pointed me toward it for the Glenn Gould piano clip from the Goldberg Variations. I apologize in advance if I'm coming in at the middle of a discussion and telling things you already know, but you raised a wonderful philosophical point about the, "one shot only nature of performance art." In fact, this was a point on which Glenn Gould frequently spoke and wrote. He gave up concert perfomance at the height of his career in part because of this issue. He spoke of the "non take two-ness of concertizing." He espoused a philosophy of recording that permitted him to reconsider each take and assemble from clips a master performance that would be issued as his recording. Even this video, we are told, was produced in that manner.

    I thought you might be interested.

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  6. Yes, absolutely. With visual arts and crafts, we have time to mull over idea, let them gestate and even edit. I have a friend who is a jewlery maker and a singer, and she says performance is more tense. On the other hand, my husband points out that some performances, particularly in jazz recordings, show amazing chemistry of the place, time, performer and audience that can be magical and not repeated.

    Still, I am glad I am not in performance art. The pressure, even on maintaining good health, must be so immense!

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